Let’s face it: In traditional classroom environments, many students feel like round pegs trying to fit into square holes. “A lot of students have difficulty engaging in an on-ground class because of class size, intimidation, reluctance to sound ‘dumb’ in a live setting, or many other reasons. An online class is great for people who are shy, or reticent to speak or simply need more time to collect their thoughts,” says ClearDegree’s Leatherwood.
In many ways, getting a degree online is no different than getting a traditional degree. In perhaps the most important way (financially), it can be nearly the same. So proceed with caution and healthy skepticism. Consider the cost-benefit tradeoffs, and be thoughtful about taking on additional debt. You may not have pictured yourself as a strong candidate for getting your degree online, but it could just be the right — and best — decision for your particular set of circumstances.
Maybe you’re balancing a full time job and family, but still want to earn a degree. Good news it that anyone can earn a degree online. The right online program can help you advance your career, or even help you enter a new industry. For those interested in furthering their education, there are thousands of online colleges to choose from. While there are several excellent online colleges to choose from, it can be overwhelming to find the right school for your needs. To help you in your search, we have put together a list of our top online colleges to help narrow it down.
Today the school serves more than 16,000 students and has the reputation as one of the most prestigious universities in the country. Stanford has seven different schools in order to serve both graduate and undergraduate degree levels. These schools are Education, Engineering, Business, Law, Medicine, Humanities & Sciences, and Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences. Stanford also hosts Stanford Online for online learners who choose to take courses off-campus.

Lastly, assess how well, or even whether, the school trains its faculty to teach online. Not every professor is cut out for online teaching. He or she needs to be comfortable with technology and be able to engage a virtual audience. Looking at a school's faculty website pages might give you a sense of the resources and training related to online teaching that are available to faculty, as well as the school’s expectations of faculty who teach online.
One of the top accredited online colleges in the state, NAU offers five baccalaureate programs leading to BA or BS degrees. Busy professionals in any of the five programs -- management, RN to BSN, computer information technology, liberal arts, and small business administration -- study courses broken down into modules in which their real-world knowledge can be applied to learning. The programs are competency-based with no set classes or schedules.

Bachelor's degree programs can be earned online in fields like communication studies, business administration, the liberal arts, logistics and supply chain management, nursing, and health sciences. Master's degree programs can be earned in fields like administration -- with several areas of specialization, education -- with several areas of specialization, English, communication, and counselling. Students seeking to earn a degree at their own pace can do so with a catalog of personalized learning programs.

The Center for Online Education understands online colleges have a dynamic future as new technologies and new uses for existing tools change the way we communicate, connect, and collaborate. In the coming years, virtual reality, blended program delivery, makerspaces, predictive learning platforms, gigabit Internet speeds, and other emerging technologies will push the limits of what was once thought possible at online colleges. Social media and networking sites will continue to impact online teaching and learning, providing a virtual space for authentic interaction, relationship building, and participation in professional communities. Our in-house team, and panel of contributors, are all graduates of accredited colleges and are here to help inform your online college journey.
Examples of digital media include software, digital images, digital video, video games, web pages and websites, including social media, data and databases, digital audio, such as MP3 and electronic books. Digital media often contrasts with print media, such as printed books, newspapers and magazines, and other traditional or analog media, such as images, movies or audio tapes. Digital media has a significant broad and complex impact on society and culture. Combined with the Internet and personal computing, digital media has caused disruptive innovation in publishing, journalism, public relations, entertainment, education, commerce and politics. Digital media has also posed new challenges to copyright and intellectual property laws, fostering an open content movement in which content creators voluntarily give up some or all of their legal rights to their work. The ubiquity of digital media and its effects on society suggest that we are at the start of a new era in industrial history, called the Information Age, perhaps leading to a paperless society in which all media are produced and consumed on computers.[2] However, challenges to a digital transition remain, including outdated copyright laws, censorship, the digital divide, and the spectre of a digital dark age, in which older media becomes inaccessible to new or upgraded information systems.[3] Digital media has a significant, wide-ranging and complex impact on society and culture.[2]
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